Good Times at the White River Yarns Felt Hat Trunk Show

My first-ever trunk show last Thursday at White River Yarns was so much fun… In fact, the party started before I even showed up!

Hours before our 6pm start, I received this nice online testimonial:

Knitted felt hat #4 of 2014, with freehand dragonfly embroidery by New Hampshire fiber artist, Carrie Cahill Mulligan, of Canaan, NH.

Knitted felt hat #4 of 2014, with freehand dragonfly embroidery.

Hi Carrie,

I was at Karen’s yarn shop today and purchased the dragonfly purple felted hat. I just loved it and it is so nice and warm.

I’m not a hat lover but this one spoke to me and I even loved it on.

Thank you, you do such amazing work.
xoRobin

Semi-precious jasper beads make fascinating dragonfly eyes in this detail of freehand dragonfly embroidery on knitted felt hat #4 of 2014, by New Hampshire fiber artist, Carrie Cahill Mulligan, of Canaan, NH.

Semi-precious jasper beads make fascinating dragonfly eyes.

Yay, Robin! Thank *you* for starting our Felt Hat Trunk Show party off right!

Ever the gracious hostess, Karen ordered in some pizza and opened a couple bottles of wine while folks gathered to knit, offering color advice for potential hat owners:

Crowd-sourcing opinions on just the right color felt hat at White River Yarns CCM felt hat trunk show.

Crowd-sourcing opinions on just the right color felt hat at White River Yarns.

Sometimes a special felt hat chooses *you* more than you choose *it*.

Sometimes a special felt hat chooses *you* more than you choose *it*.

The trunk show went so well, we decided to leave 14 fancy hats, plus yarn + patterns for knit-your-own felt hat kits at the shop until the end of February.

So if you’re still looking to treat yourself a one-of-a-kind felt hat or kit, please do drop by White River Yarns. I think you’ll be glad you did!

This Birthday Girl is treating herself to a one-of-a-kind felt hat this year... Happy birthday, Kate!

Look who’s treating herself to a one-of-a-kind felt hat this year–> Happy Birthday, Kate!

17 Days of Green – Local Food is Green Food

Did you know that Americans use almost as much petroleum on food as we do on transportation? We each consume about 400 gallons** of oil per year on agriculture.

Farming machines (from tractors & tillers, to combines and harvesters) guzzle fuel, while petroleum-based fertilizers gobble up more than a quarter of all US farming energy.

Time to eat... locally!

But transporting food accounts for the vast majority of petroleum in our diets.

On average, each meal ingredient travels 1,500 miles before landing on your plate! It follows that eating locally-grown food dramatically reduces your oil consumption.

Organic or not, local food is green food.

The Farmers Diner in Quechee, Vermont.

In nearby Quechee, Vermont, The Farmers Diner serves up tasty, affordable meals from local ingredients produced within a 70-mile radius.

Serving food produced within an hour's drive, The Farmers Diner epitomizes local eating.

The Farmers Diner serves delicious, locally-roasted coffee from the Vermont Coffee Company.

This is unpretentious diner food, served in a classic diner car, complete with counter service and swivel-stools:

A visit to The Farmers Diner is a step back in time, but with an eye on our environmental future.

From bacon, sausage & eggs, to bread, milk & cheese, to cider and maple syrup, The Farmers Diner serves locally produced food for your eating pleasure.

Local breakfast served all day.

"Food From Here" is sourced from many neighboring farms and bakeries.

For many of us, “Think globally, act locally” sounds good, but is too vague to help guide our daily choices.

The Farmers Diner motto issues a more specific call to action:

“Think locally, eat neighborly.”

Words to live by!

With such tasty advice, sometimes it is easy being green.

**Special thanks to Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle for facts, figures and inspiration. It’s easy to read, and full of tips and recipes. Highly recommended!

Moments in Glass: Nicholas Kekic of Tsuga Studios

Miniature bud vases by 3rd generation American Glass Artist, Nicholas Kekic of Tsuga Studios

Miniature bud vases by 3rd generation American Glass Artist, Nicholas Kekic of Tsuga Studios

My Blog Triage classmate, Jackie Jacobson recently wrote about glass artists she knows from the Pacific Northwest.

Which got me thinking about some of my favorite League of New Hampshire Craftsmen glass artists:

Hand-blown Spring Tree wine goblets by American glass artist Jordana Korsen.

Hand-blown Spring Tree wine goblets by American glass artist Jordana Korsen.

There’s Jordana Korsen and her fantastic tree goblets. There’s Nathan Macomber’s beautiful sculptural work, Philip Jacobs’ amazing blown glass lampshades, and Harry Bessett’s wonderful stemless wineglasses.

But my latest favorite is Nicholas Kekic, maker of gorgeous, luminous vases, each exquisitely shaped.

Nick Kekik's frosted hand-blown glass vases add so much joy to our 1840's dining room.

Nick Kekik's frosted hand-blown glass vases add so much joy to our 1840's dining room.

Do you have a favorite glass artist? Do tell… I’m always looking for functional fine art to grace our old home. ;)